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that it is the only factor that will get mohamed morsi to be an honest broker in the region. i think it's much -- it would be a much better bet to appeal to his sense of wanting to be a statesman. wanting to be a responsible actor, wanting to be -- to live up to the stature of everything that egypt can be in the community of nations. i think threatening mohamed morsi in that way of all the things that are going to motivate him, i'm not sure threats like that, that we are going to take away $2 billion which again, i would say yes, it's a difficult economy. but it's not quite what it used to be. >> what about the imf and the $4.8 billion they have in reserves potentially for egypt? i mean, it's a linchpin of cash that could flow their way or not. >> again, these are all complicated issues. i still am not sure that threatening mohamed morsi is the way to get what you want done. >> so we reported yesterday senator mccain suggested sending former president clinton to negotiate a longer deal. he could be an honest broker that brought a lot of leverage and graf aas the to it. i spoke to debbie wasser
think they're pretty close right now. i know that the egyptian president, mohamed morsi, very much involved. he's got good relations with hamas, israelis have a relationship, i don't know how good it is, but they have a relationship with the egyptians. there have been israeli envoys that have gone to cairo to meet with high-ranking egyptian officials. trying to broker a deal. no trust, hamas has to trust for the israelis and israelis have no trust for the hamas. there have been a lot of rockets and missiles coming from gaza into israeli and the israeli air strikes pounded away at targets in garz. a lot of casualties. there's no goodwill on the part of either of these, they don't trust each other. having said that, looks like they're close. hamas seems to think within the next hour or two some agreement will be announced, thanks to the egyptians. but i spoke with the israeli government spokesman for the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu in the past hour, he said there's no deal yet. he didn't rule out there wouldn't be a deal but he said there's no deal yet. until all of the
are spending the night in tahrir square. they are demonstrating against president mohamed morsi's controversial decree granting himself unchecked political power. earlier today, protesters threw rocks at police who responded with tear gas. we'll have much more on this story at the bottom of the hour. >>> an emergency at the u.s. state department today, fire trucks raced to the department headquarters in washington shortly before noon. a flash fire in the duct work of the building forced everyone to evacuate and sent three people to the hospital, one in serious condition. construction workers were among the few people in that building because it is a holiday weekend. >>> investigators are still trying to figure out the source of a gas explosion that damaged more than 40 buildings in springfield, massachusetts, last night. a wwlp camera captured the moment of the blast. 18 people were injured, mostly emergency workers. they had been called to the scene because of reports of a gas smell. they had evacuated some of the area about an hour before that explosion. >>> superstorm sandy has now cost new
of cairo. demonstrators are angry over president mohammed morsi's decision to increase his power. morsi stripped powers from judges to overturn any of his decrees. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. we had hopeful seen the protests in the capital. are they spreading now? >> reporter: it looks like it, ramdi. a number of protesters trying to attack the offices of the muslim brotherhood. that's when they say the muslim brotherhood fought them back, and that's when you had clashes between the two sides. a number of people injured and arrested there. also, reports of demonstrations south of cairo, but the heart of these demonstrations continues to be here, tahrir square. we're going to give you a live look of what things look like right now. a few thousand people there. many of chem with their tents pitched. these are people who represent the liberal factions, the youth rights, the women's rights groups, the secularists here, and when you talk to them, they say they're determined to stay here until mr. morsi, the president, heeds their call. they're the peaceful protesters. at times
mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement. certainly within israel and the political circles that i've been speaking to, at least. it's something that mr. barak says that he wants to do for a long time but the recent operation by israeli forces in gaza delayed his announcement to do that. something he says he's been planning to do for a long time. this is a figure, as you mention, who's been in public office and public service for his entire
to be with you. i'm terrell brown. we begin in egypt. president mohamed morsi is scheduled to meet with senior judges today to discuss his move to assume absolute authority. morsi's power grab has triggered three days of violent protests, injuring hundreds. yesterday the egyptian stock market was down more than 9.5%. some u.s. lawmakers are urging caution in dealing with egypt's new islamic leader. >> we don't obviously want to see a democratically elected autocrat take the place of an undemocratically elected dictator. which was the case before that. >> holly williams is in cairo this morning. what's the latest there now? >> reporter: good morning, terrell. here in egypt we saw a lot more violence yesterday. in cairo, protesters who were angry with president morsi fought running street battles with the police. protesters throwing rocks, police firing back with tear gas. one person was killed when a crowd attacked the headquarters of the muslim brotherhood, the islamist group from which the president draws much of his support. beyond the violence you get the sense the president's opponents don
to be proposing for a truce. >>> egyptian president mohamed morsi is seen as a critical player. he met yesterday with u.n. secretary ban ki-moon. turkey's prime minister complicated matters when he reefr referred to israel as a terrorist state after attending talks in egypt. president obama spoke by phone yesterday to both morsi and netanyahu during his trip to southeast asia. in gaza hamas is calling for israel to stop killing its leaders and end a six-year blockade. meanwhile, new explosions continued through palestinian territory. they say they targeted the national islamic bank which they accuse hamas of using to pay its employees. an nbc analysis found israel has killed nearly 40 hamas militants over the last week, often using high precision drone strikes but the civilian toll has been high as well. thousands of people turned out for the funerals of four young children killed in an israeli air strike. meanwhile, israel's so-called iron dome missile defense has helped keep most missiles out of heavily populated areas. still some have made it through, like this rocket that hit a school. joini
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
. in egypt, we've seen huge protests against president mohamed morsi and the new powers he assumed just a day after the truce. he's insisting he's committed to democracy, but opponents are calling him a dictator it could be a complication for the cease-fire between israel and hamas negotiations moving forward. let's go to cnn's reza sayah in cairo. >> reporter: joe, the coming weeks here in egypt are going to be fascinating when it comes to politics. that's because there is an intensifying faceoff between egyptian president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in p
president mohammed morsi in a few light. no matter how the truce plays out, his reputation has been enhanced. paula newton looks at the winners and losers in this conflict. >> reporter: however crude the calculation, especially amid the civilian casualties, there are winners and losers in this truce, and they are already reshaping political alliances in the region. we begin in egypt and president mohammed morsi clearly underestimated his handling of what a mine field of competing interests has given him much needed political capital in both the arab world and the united states. >> puts a civilian president in egypt perceived as a weak leader has much, to everyone's surprise, delivered. >> reporter: then there's israel and its tenacious prime minister benjamin netanyahu. after israel targeted and killed hamas's military leader, he launched air strikes hitting more than 1,500 targets in gaza, dismantling some of hamas's arsenal of weapons. israel had a successful combat debut of iron dome. u.s.-funded defense shield that kept dozens of rockets from hitting israeli civilians. the counter point
now. demonstrators are back spending the night in tahrir square. president mohamed morsi announced sweeping new powers for himself. ordering egyptian court not to overturn any decree or law issued since he took office. as the crowds gather there's a growing unease over what could happen next. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against egyptian president mohamed morrissey not the big numbers that we saw on friday but certainly still a lot of people out here, lots of food stands, about 30 tents, which is an indication that many of these protesters want to be here for a while. it's not clear how long they will day here. when you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsi's controversial decrees. >> the beginning avenue era for a tyrant. >> he's saying that nobody can revise what i say. he's actually throwing the new system out of the scene. >> reporter: big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences on saturday where factions posed to mr. morsi made moves to put pressure on the president. of course a number of his decrees seem to weaken the judiciary. t
tonight in cairo. demonstrators back spending the night in tahrir square. president mohamed morsi has announced sweeping new powers for himself ordering egyptian courts not to overturn any decree or law issued since he took office. this dramatic video is from the city of damanur where members of the muslim brotherhood exchanged gunfire with anti-morsi protesters. reza sayah is tracking the story for us in cairo. >> reporter: demonstrations continue against egyptian president mohamed morsi. not the big number that is we saw on friday, but certainly still a lot of people out here, lots of food stands. about 30 tents, which is an indication that many of these protesters want to be here for a while. it's not clear how long they're going to stay here. but when you talk to them, they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsi's controversial decrees. >> the beginning of a new era for a tyrant. >> he's saying nobody can revise what i say. he's actually throwing the system out of the scene totally. >> reporter: big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences on saturday where facti
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
to president mohamed morsi is growing. for a third straight day, protesters hit the streets demanding he rescind a decree that gives him unlimited power. we get more now from cairo. >> reporter: outrage, clashes, and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time, the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsi. >> we're here because we don't want him to rule us anymore. >> it's a one-man show. he wants to do everything. this is nothing at all what we want. >> reporter: on thursday, the new islamist president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says are designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that still is missing a parliament. >> whether it causes anyone to overturn any of the declarations. that's the same place the parliament is born. technically, it means for now he can do wh
president mohamed morsi's decision to broaden his power. it is the second day of protest. nbc's jim maceda is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporte
, including president mohamed morsi. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu, thanked morsi for his efforts to help broker the cease-fire. speaking to the israeli prime minister, president obama reaffirmed the united states and said it would use the moment to help israel strengthen security needs especially dealing with the issue of arms and weapons being smuggled into gaza. president obama in talking to president morsi, again, thanked him for his role and talked about the need to try to create and achieve a broader security situation in the region. president obama certainly spent a fair amount of his day yesterday dealing with this. the white house saying that secretary of state hillary clinton did play a pivotal role. one of the key things that they are pointing to that has come out of all of the talks and negotiations, alex, there's a question mark surrounding the egyptian president mohamed morsi, and that question mark has gone away. fe feel president obama's relationship has gotten stronger. he has been talking to him throughout this entire process over the past several days and they f
erupt in egypt. thousands demonstrating against a controversial grab for power by mohammed morsi. many saying he's acting like a modern day pharaoh. a big republican turns his back on the grover norquist tax pledge. is the gop preparing to give in to the president? is and thousands of people packing into stores today. watch your wallet. we'll tell you how the shopping season is really adding up. let's go "outfront." >>> good evening. i'm tom foreman. egypt erupts. thousands of angry egyptians have been protesting in opposition to a controversial power grabby egypt's president. at least 80 people have been injured and one killed in clashes with police who fired tear gas into the crowds. the unrest began after he issued a series of orders which allow him to run the country unchecked until a new constitution is written. morsi says his actions are meant to speed up reform and achieve political and social stability. >> translator: i have said beforened i repeat again, that i would never use a legislation against individuals, parties, men, women or muslims or christians for personal ga
president mohamed morsi is seen as critical to any peace dale. his muslim brotherhood is close to hamas. a hamas spokesman is quoted in one report saying we hold absolutely no hope of hillary clinton helping to resolve this conflict. >> susan mcginnis in washington this morning. thank you so much. as we reported egypt is expected to play a key role in brokering a truce and trying to maintain it. clarissa ward reports from caro this morning. >> reporter: good morning. >> we were expecting some type of announcement last night regarding a cease-fire. what happened? >> reporter: that's the million dollar question. everyone here in egypt was expecting for president morsi to make an announcement last night. they schedule ad time 9:00 p.m. local. the english language newspaper here has the headline as israel and gaza agree on a cease-fire. that's the level of confidence here that people felt that there was going to be a cease-fire agreement. now trying to determine why that agreement never happened is very difficult. obviously people on each side have different opinions. one official with the
power. mohamed morsi decreed that all his decisions are final and not subject to appeal or review. he also ordered the retrial of former president hosni mubarak for the killing of protesters during the revolution. some egyptians protested morsi's action today, accusing him and the muslim brotherhood of seizing too much power. president obama spent the holiday at the white house. he phoned 10 american service men and women in afghanistan to thank them for their sacrifice. at a u.s. base in kabul, troops feasted on 200 turkeys and the trimmings. about 66,000 americans are still deployed in afghanistan. most are expected home by the end of 2014. as we reported here last night, america's ambassador to the united nations, susan rice, has broken her silence about the controversial remarks she made back in september about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in that attack. sharyl attkisson in washington has more on that tonight. sharyl. >> reporter: ambassador rice defended her comment from more than nine weeks a
tension in egypt this morning, among opponents of that country's president, mohamed morsi. things started getting rough on the streets of cairo, with protesters hurling molotov cocktails at police. they are seething about morsi's powers of placing himself beyond judicial review. a massive demonstration by morsi's opponent is planned for today. >>> we wanted you to check this out. from australia, early this morning. look at that. a crane, high above the streets of sydney caught fire. and then, the crane's arm falls on the roof of a nearby building. the rain operator escaped down a loader. no one was injured. the site was closed for a time. two weeks ago, concerns that diesel was leaking from the crane. the crane's owner also owns the crane in new york that collapsed during hurricane sandy. >> interesting there. >>> and speaking of sandy, one month after the month monster s the financial toll keeps growing. andrew cuomo says the repair for the state and new york city will top $32 billion. and the fallout continues at lipa, the long island utility company that's under fire for its slow respo
by the white house for a potential security post. >>> overseas, egyptian president mohamed morsi is expected to call for unity while addressing his nation today. tension still very high after he issued an edict that will give him sweeping power above the reach of judicial review until a new constitution is adopted. they're rushing to finish a new draft of the constitution that could see a vote as early as today. but with protesters continuing to clash with riot police, a rushed constitution by the islamist dominated assembly may make matters worse. >>> well now to business. according to the latest report from the federal reserve, the u.s. economy grew at a "measured pa pace" over the past two months with rises in hiring and consumer spending. let's go live to london. steve, what's the latest? >>> yeah, there is a lot of interesting stories in the mix at the moment. the big story is still and will remain the fiscal cliff. every time a policymaker on capitol hill or in the white house makes a speech about this or a station to the media, the markets move very aggressively. yes, there is a case
meeting with mohamed morsi. you know the deal. take a look at pictures. the fighting in gaza intense overnight. 27 more palestinians killed by israeli air strikes bringing the death toll to 137. >>> meantime, police in arizona have no idea why a pickup truck driver was driving the wrong way on the highway when he collided head-on with a tour bus. the 78-year-old man was killed instantly when his vehicle burst into flames near i-10 near case grande. >>> the church of england is saying no to women bishops. the church's governing body didn't get the two-thirds majority it needed topaz the measure. it did have enough in the house of clergy but did not get enough votes falling short by just four votes. >>> a new heart pump has just been approved by the food and drug administration. the hardware's ventricular system is a battery-powered device that's planted in the chest. it's smaller than previously-approved heart pumps. it could be easier for patients to tolerate. >>> here we are on this holiday week. we have to talk holiday travel. i'm hopping on a plane tomorrow. kind of curious how th
read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're preparing for? >> certainly would case that they're preparing for a ground invasion of gaza. in fact, this is very similar to what happened in the 2008, 2009 fight between hamas and israel. israel for the first few days pounded targets around gaza, and then sent in the troops. certainly, i mean, if you listen, for insta
, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are remini
, opponents rallied against mohamed morsi, he met with the senior judges monday trying to quiet the dispute over his effort to assume near absolute power. holly williams is in cairo. good morning holly. >> reporter: good morning, charlie and norah. he met with several senior judges and told them that one of his new powers immuneity from the court would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem is that we don't know exactly what that means. it certainly won't satisfy his opponents. they're holding a large demonstration today in tahrir square, right behind me. you'll remember the square from last year's egyptian revolution which ousted the country's long-time dictator. one of the organizers of today's demonstration told me he is expecting half a million people. that seems ambitious. at the moment there are only a few thousand people out. some of president's morsi's supporters were planning a gathering but canceled that because they were afraid of clashes. we may see more violent confrontations as we have over the last few days. norah, charlie? >> holly, thanks. >>> hum
are crying foul. it is sparking another day of protests against president mohamed morsi. morsi's supporters plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on by a panel dominated by president's morsi's political allies, neither all of them islamists. the constitution gives islamic sharia law a more specific role in government and doesn't guarantee women's equality. it als
-democracy activist mohammed el baradi calling on morsi to rescind his decrees. it's not clear how many judges are going to heed the call for a strike because remember a lot of judges in egypt support mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood and so do a lot of egyptians. supporters of muslim brotherhood have called for demonstrations throughout the next few days, and that's why there's a lot of drama that comes with these developments. you have mr. morsi seemingly entrenched in power. the muslim brotherhood movement taking on opposing factions who are mobilizing, demanding for him to rescind his decrees. rez sesay a -- reza sayah, cair. >>> we have learned a delegation from gaza is now in cairo. the three sides will get back to hammering out the cease-fire. adding his voice to the discussion, the leader of hezbollah in lebanon. he sent a stern warning today to israel threatening major retaliation if israel makes a move on lebanon. hezbollah is not involved in the renewed hostilities but they have fought with israel in the past. tensions their shared border really has never gone away. >>> at least
, the newly installed president of egypt, mohamed morsi, trying to encourage them to engage with hamas. of course, hamas is classified technically with the u.s. government as a terrorist organization, there are no formal ties, trying to engage hamas to stop this rocket attack to come to some sort of solution so cooler heads can prevail, mara. >> one of the things in terms of the political issue here, the president in the past has been criticized for not being strong enough in his support of israel. do you get the response in washington that his response now is significant in satisfying people who would like for him to express stronger support for israel? >> you know, there has been some controversy, some tension, frankly, between prime minister netanyahu and the president. that's no secret. there was the recent episode where the prime minister went before the united nations andrew that red line, you remember, across that little cartoon bomb. some disagreement about when and where that red line should be drawn with respect to iran's nuclear program. but look, there is no question that a
, egypt's president mohamed morsi has met with both the head of hamas's political office and head of islamic jihad, the two biggest factions in gaza. both of them are saying that they're willing to enter truce with israel on certain conditions. these conditions are that gaza lifts a punishing blockade and siege that has been imposed on gaza since 2006 and allows the free moment movement of people in and out of the territory and supplies and medicine. they want assurances from israel that israel does not carry out any more assassinations on top palestinian leaders like the one we saw last wednesday that triggered all of this. at the same time, they want guarantees from the international community that israel will abide by these commitments. for its part israel says that the only condition it would accept is a complete cessation of rocket fire into southern israel and wants egypt to guarantee no more weapons will be smuggled into the gaza strip. both sides say they want to avert a war but really right now, they have demands and egyptian officials are hinting they have narrowed the g
this has played out particularly, clearly mohamed morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it came to trying to mediate deals between these two sides, egypt has always played something of a pretty critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the west and is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity significantly closer to the hamas leadership here in gaza. that really changed a lot of the dynamics and the way we've been seeing things play out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical te
, where protests have erupted over president mohamed morsi's decree expanding his power. jim is in cairo. good morning. >> reporter: almost two years after their revolution, egyptians seem more divided than ever. after many hear their elected leader has driven the wedge deeper and wider. at dawn, there were more tents and protesters around tahrir square, but that didn't stop clashes with police, where protesters blocked traffic defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. >> translator: we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved. >> reporter: morsi told his supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast track a new constitution being written by a mostly islamist assembly, after which he said he'd give up those powers. yes, he might be a dictator for the time being, but these powers will be transferred to an elected parliament, he said. but the decrees have triggered protests and riots across the nation. dozens were injured in alexandria when angry youth s
? does tony blair think this new egyptian president of the muslim brotherhood, mohammed morsi will be somebody who really wants to create peace there, because we know he has a very different relationship with hamas than the former egyptian president. >> right. he is much more different than former president hosnni mubarak. he has a lot at stake right now, and he knows it, president mor of egypt. he is trying to improve his country, and he knows if egypt, for example, were to sever its peace treaty, that was seriously rupture the entire egyptian relationship with the united states. egypt still gets a lot of economic assistance from the united states military assistance from the united states. it's seeking enormous amounts of aid from the international monetary fund. egypt's economy is in deep trouble right now. exports have dried up. tourism industry has really suffered as a result of what's going on, so i think the egyptians under president morsi, they want to maintain their relationship on a cool level with the israelis, and they would like to see the fighting between israel
lifted. >>> meantime, the new president of egypt is coming under scrutiny. mohamed morsi just granted himself sweeping, new powers, declaring the courts will no longer be allowed to overturn his decisions. opponents fete fires across the country in protest. >>> spectacular images out of russia now, showing a giant fireball moscow. it took 12 hours to put this thing out. amazi amazingly, no injuries reported. >>> back here at home, the post office, in desperate need of cash, is testing out a new service. same-day package delivery. it's being aimed at online shoppers who want or need the instant gratification of a store purchase and are willing to play a flat fee of about 10 bucks. the postal service says it's going to test this idea next month in san francisco. >>> and finally, as you eye the bargains during this holiday season, somebody may be eyeing you. some stores are now using mannequins outfitted with a tiny camera embedded in the eye. they can scope out shoplifters we spying on them at eye level and collecting information on shoppers' habits. the italian company that makes the s
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
. norah and charlie? morsiter evans, thank you. mohamed morsi will speak to the people of egypt today, grantedng why he granted elf almost ast absolute power as the egyptian assembly works on new constitution. holly williams is in cairo this morning where demonstrators have blocked access to the united block embase. >> reporter: this is now a battle of wills between mohamed orsi, egypt's first democratically elected president and his opponents. tahrir square in central cairo, pres rotesters have accused the president of behaving like a areator are camped out. onstrationlanning a demonstration there on saturday. there are fears that could spark spark mlent clashes after an lready tumultuous week. address tmorsi will address the later later on today. so far he is showing no signs of backing do backing down from the expanded new powers he gave himself last week. week. he says he needs those powers to guide guide egypt to a new constitution. the constitution is being drafted by an assembly dominated by president morsi's islamist allies. two more liberal members quit because they said thei
efforts attacked the offices of president mohamed morsi's freedom and justice party. the political wing of the muslim brotherhood. demonstrators are angry at president morsmorsi's latest decision, one that's reverting the country to a dictatorship. >> we want a contry of institutions, not symbolized in one person who makes all decisions and nobody can say no. >> reporter: morsi's decree gave him legislative powers and extended the time to write a new constitution by two months. morsi's decisions are beyond judicial challenge and dismissed the attorney general. now the attorney general backed by the country's powerful judges, many appointed by former dictator hosni mubarak, are fighting back. they have called for a nationwide strike in the courtrooms. president morsi and other islamist parties have blamed egypt's judiciary for blocking key reforms. it's why president morsi on friday told his mainly islamic supporters he issued the sweeping decree and why many across the country are backing his decision. >> translator: the president's decisions are good, and we support him. he's working h
president mohamed morsi's power grab is challenged. but will it be enough to preserve democracy? >>> and medical marijuana a 7-year-old patient in oregon is taking the drug. is it right treatment for kids with cancer? dr. sanjay gupta reports. >>> plus -- scott kelly i didn't cal twin brother of nasa astronaut mark kelley, the husband of former congresswoman gabrielle giffords, takes on a historic mission. he heads to space for a year. we'll take a look at what it will be like living in space for 365 days. this is "cnn newsroom" and it's happening now. [ male announcer ] this is bob, a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription
in egypt today after the new controversial constitution criticizes the power grab by president mohammed morsi is approved. he's expected to sign the document saturday but not the end of the conflict. the egyptian constitution needs to be approved by citizens many of whom are still angry at the moressy government. >>> nasa said it has found large deposits of ice on mercury. some areas of mercury can reach 800 degrees fahrenheit, some areas are completely shielded from the sun allowing the ice to form. nasa plans to send its messenger spacecraft to that area for a closer look in the coming months. >>> groundbreaking therapy is under way to help patients who suffer from posttramatic stress disorder. what's revolutionary about the work is the use of an illegal drug commonly referred to as ecstasy, our chief medical correspondent dr. sanjay gupta has had exclusive access to the patients and their sessions. here's his report -- >> some part of you is on guard. it just wouldn't stop. i couldn't shut it down. >> reporter: for rachel hope, the mental agony began in childhood when she says she wa
this morning. the document will be presented to president mohamed morsi tomorrow for his signature. egyptians will vote on the draft in two weeks. >>> wow. in syria, as the internet goes dark, a is the u.s. closer to arming the rebels and is time out for bashar al assad? jim clancy is next. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto® is proven effective to reduce the risk of an afib-related stroke. there is limited data on how these drugs compare when warfarin is well managed. no routine blood monitoring means bob can spend his extra time
rushing a vote on a final draft of a constitution as protests continue against the president, mohammed morsy. he has faced bitter criticism. >>> the state of texas has filed papers to seize a large ranch owned by the flds, a fundamentalist radical mormon sex that believes in polygamy. its leader, warren jeffs, is serving a life sentence. >>> you never know what you might see on the streets of new york city this is a first. casper the pony and razzie the zebra roaming free on staten island. they got free from the home where they lived. they were returned home safe and sound. >> can you imagine mommy, mommy, look. >> they are getting along just fine. >> moment of kindness captured with a camera. coming up, a young police officer's deed goes viral for all the right reasons.od ays. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ part of a whole new l
protesting what they view as a blatant power grab by president mohamed horsey. with tensions mounting yesterday, morsi appeared to soften his controversial attempt to award himself near absolute power above the reach of the law. in a vaguely worded statement, morsi spokesman backtracked slightly saying that only acts of sovereignty would be immune from oversight. >>> well, u.s. consumers went big this weekend for small business saturday. millions of holiday shoppers spent a total of $5.5 billion during the third annual local business shopping event. mika spent half of that in the south of france. and that's not even counted in that tally. for more on the holiday shopping season and the impact on the economy, let's go right now to cnbc's steve sedwood live in london with us. steve, what's it looking like over there? >> it's looking pretty good. i haven't even started my holiday season shopping. i'll leave that right till the last moment. what is really fascinating is every single survey i've been reading about the whole thanksgiving holiday weekend has been positive about spending in t
to cairo, she spent hours with morsi and with his foreign minister, mohammed kamul, finding the compromise that israel and hamas could live with. mainly stop the hostilities today and negotiate the other demands later. alex? >> jim, thank you very much for that live report from cairo with the latest on the brokering of the truce. joining me now, former u.s. ambassador to the u.n. for special affairs, stewart is a special assistant to the president and is currently president and ceo of the nonpartisan meridian international center in washington. welcome, stewart, thank you for being here on thanksgiving. >> good morning. >> you were also partly raised in the middle east. your father served in the foreign service. you've seen firsthand from a young age that cease-fires have a history of collapsing. do you feel this one is different? >> well, no, actually, they're very fragile in the middle east. these cycles can break down at any moment. but in this case, what you have is the emergence of a consensus that, you know, on the israeli side, the cost of a ground invasion was not something that th
region, and they have a new mohammed muslim brotherhood, brand-new democratically elected but untested government. morsi wants to be as a statesman in the region, but he hasn't faced these crises before. >> thank you very much. we'll talk with you in the next few days on this especially. we have breaking news. moments ago eric holder announced a historic fine against bp for its role in the largest oil spill in our nation's history. bp will pay $4.5 billion for the deadly disaster in the gulf of mexico. the company will also plead guilty to a dozen felony charges including misconduct for the death of the 11 men who died in that explosion that triggered the oil spill. two employees also face manslaughter charges, and just moments ago, attorney general holder says this case is far from over. >> i want to be really absolutely clear that today's resolution does not, does not mark the end of our efforts. in fact, our credit investigation remains ongoing, and we will continue to follow all credible leads and pursue any charges that are warranted. >> holder says much of the money bp has agreed
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